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Title: Roofing Operations
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Goal: this task will increase the success of the goal to apply Cal/OSHA safety suggestions.
John Mitchell published this Cognitive Task at isodoit.com under Industry | Construction
Doers: 1 | Form: Cognitive Task | Phase: Engagement | Type: Pre-Event | Level: 1 | Code:
Start: Sep 15, 2019 | When: | Duration: 5 Minute(s)
Steps:
  • The next Steps cover Cal/OSHA safety regulations for Roofing Operations. Where appropriate, we have referenced the code from Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations.

    The topics we will cover in this isoBlog are:

    -Potential Hazards
    -Fall Protection Methods
    -Roof Slopes of 3:12 or Greater
    -Documented Employee Training
    -Hot Operations
    -Personal Fall Protection

    After each of the next Steps, select the 'successful' response to indicate that you have read and understand the Step.

    Select 'successful' now and proceed.
    response:
  • Potential Hazards

    Working conditions at roofing projects are often difficult and continuously expose workers to serious hazards. In California one of the most common causes of work-related deaths is falls from roofs.

    Injuries common to the roofing industry include (1) broken bones because of falls; (2) back injuries because of awkward postures and heavy lifting; and (3) burns from contact with hot roofing asphalt and associated equipment.

    Roofing operations are classified as either single-unit or multi-unit. Examples of single-unit (monolithic) roofing are built-up roofing, flat-seam metal roofing, and vinyl roofing. Examples of multi-unit roofing are asphalt shingles, cement, clay and slate tile, standing seam metal panels, shingle metal roofing, and wood shingles.

    Employees shall be protected from falls from roofs. Steps 3-7 below detail the regulations aimed to minimize or eliminate the hazards associated with the roofing industry.
    response:
  • Fall Protection Methods

    Specific fall protection methods are used for:

    • Different roof heights and slope conditions
    • Different types of roofing operations including custom- built homes
    • Re-roofing operations
    • Roofing replacements or additions on existing residential dwelling units
    • Roofing operations (including new production-type residential construction) with slopes less than 3:12

    -For single-unit roofs with slopes of 0:12 through 4:12 and more than 20 feet in height. 1730(b)
    a. Warning lines and headers 1730(b).
    b. Personal fall protection systems per 1724(f).
    c. Catch platforms with guardrails 1724(c).
    d. Scaffold platforms 1724(d).
    e. Eave barriers 1724(e).
    f. Parapets that are 24 inches or higher 1730(b).
    g. Standard railings and toeboards. Article 16.
    Exceptions: 1) whenever any equipment is pulled by an operator who walks backwards, one or a combination of the above methods shall be applied regardless of height and 2) at those jobsites where any equipment is pulled by an operator who walks backwards or an operator rides motorized equipment the parapet must be 36 inches or more in height at those roof edges which are perpendicular (or nearly so) to the direction in which the equipment is moving.

    -For single-unit roofs with slopes exceeding 4:12 and more than 20 feet in height:
    a. Parapets that are 24 inches or higher 1730(c).
    b. Personal fall protection systems per 1724(f).
    c. Catch platforms 1724(c).
    d. Scaffold platforms 1724(d).
    e. Eave barriers 1724(e).
    f. Standard railings and toeboards. Article 16.
    Exception: 1) provisions in 1730(c) do not apply at jobsites where the motorized equipment on which the operator rides: a) has been designed for use on roofs having slopes greater than 4:12 and b) is used where a parapet is: At least 36 inches high at roof edges and perpendicular to the direction in which the equipment is moving.

    -For single-unit roofs with slopes exceeding 4:12, no equipment that is pulled by an operator walking backwards shall be used

    -For multi-unit roofs with slopes 0:12 through 5:12 and more than 20 feet in height, employees shall be protected from falls by the use of one of the following:
    a. A roof jack system as provided in Section 1724(a).
    b. A minimum of 24 inches high parapet.
    c. Other methods affording equivalent protection.

    -For multi-unit roofs with slopes exceeding 5:12 and more than 20 feet in height, employees shall be protected from falls by the use of one or a combination of the following:
    a. Parapets that are at least 24 inches high.
    b. Personal fall protection systems per 1724(f).
    c. Catch platforms 1724(c).
    d. Scaffold platforms 1724(d).
    e. Eave barriers 1724(e).
    f. Roof jack systems (safety lines are required when using roof jack systems on roofs steeper than 7:12) 1724(a).
    response:
  • Roof Slopes of 3:12 or Greater

    New production-type residential construction with roof slopes of 3:12 or greater have specific fall protection requirements. 1731

    -For New Production-Type Residential Construction with slopes 3:12 through 7:12 and the eave height exceeds 15 feet above the grade or level below, employees shall be protected from falling when on a roof surface by use of one or any combination of the following methods:
    a. Personal Fall Protection 1670.
    b. Catch Platforms 1724(c).
    c. Scaffold Platforms 1724(d).
    d. Eave Barriers 1724(e).
    e. Standard Railings and Toeboards Article 16.
    f. Roof Jack Systems 1724(a).

    -For New Production-Type Residential Construction with slopes greater than 7:12 regardless of height, employees shall be protected from falling by methods prescribed in the above subsections a, b, c, and e. 1731(c)
    response:
  • Documented Employee Training

    Roofing operations require documented employee training. For New Production-Type Residential Construction training shall include the following in addition to those required by
    1509 and 3203:

    -Work on or near gable ends

    -Slipping hazards

    -Roof holes and openings

    -Skylights

    -Work on ladders and scaffolds

    -Access to the roof

    -Placement and location of materials on the roof

    -Impalement hazards

    -Care and use of fall protection systems
    response:
  • Hot Operations

    Hot operations are subject to the following regulations:

    -Workers must not carry buckets containing hot material up ladders. 1725(a)

    -An attendant must be stationed within 100 feet of any kettle not equipped with a thermostat. 1725(d)

    -Liquefied petroleum gas cylinders must not be located where the burner will increase the temperature of the cylinder. 1725(g)

    -A Class BC fire extinguisher shall be kept near each kettle in use as shown below:
    a. For a kettle with a capacity of less than 150 gal. = 8:BC.
    b. For a kettle with a capacity of 150 gal. to 350 gal. = 16:BC.
    c. For a kettle with a capacity of more than 350 gal. = 20:BC.

    -The fuel tanks of compressed-air-fueled kettles must be equipped with a relief valve set for a pressure not to exceed 60 psi

    -Coal tar pitch operations are subject to the following requirements:
    a. Workers must use skin protection.
    b. Washing or cleansing facilities must be available.
    c. Workers must use respirators and eye protection in confined spaces that are not adequately ventilated.

    -Hot pitch and asphalt buckets have the following maximum capacities:
    a. Carry buckets = 6 gal.
    b. Mop buckets = 9 1/2 gal.
    response:
  • Personal Fall Protection

    Personal fall protection for roofing operations is regulated as follows:

    -Personal fall arrest systems, personal fall restraint systems, and positioning devices must be installed and used in accordance with Article 24 in the General Industry Safety Orders (GISO). 1724(f)

    -Safety lines must be securely attached to substantial anchorages on the roof. 1724(f)

    -Roof openings must be railed or covered. Temporary railing and toeboards shall meet the requirements of Sections 1620 and 1621. The railing shall be provided on all exposed sides, except at entrances to stairways. 1632(b)(2)

    -The cover must be securely fastened and able to withstand 2 times the expected load or a minimum of 400 lbs. Covers must bear a sign stating 'OPENING—DO NOT REMOVE'

    -An employee approaching within 6 feet of any finished skylight or skylight opening must be protected from falling through the skylight or opening as specified in 3212(e)
    response:
  • How much did this isoBlog help you to understand the Cal/OSHA safety regulations for Roofing Operations, including:

    -Potential Hazards
    -Fall Protection Methods
    -Roof Slopes of 3:12 or Greater
    -Documented Employee Training
    -Hot Operations
    -Personal Fall Protection

    Select your response below.
    response:
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